latin students like

greek students like

but asks prof first

but asks prof first

so, on a more serious note, if you happen to know any private schools looking for a high school latin teacher or any public school districts with latin programs and reasonable benefits for teachers… please let me know. the job search has officially begun with the realization that I’m not ready to go abroad for a year to teach English.

thegooddarius:

shahlalalalala:

fialansari:

quitsexingmyunicorn:

the-trickster-and-the-optimist:

immortaliarty:

peetamellarksbuns:

unicornwright:

photonsandfrisbees:

what the f*** is cotton candy


O.O 
why would you call it cotton?
It’s food. Not some material.

No, you are all wrong. It is called candy floss.


SUGAR SPIDER


The French call it “ barbe à papa” - which means “Daddy’s beard”

okay so what i have learned from this post is that other countries are really f***ing weird

arabs call it “shar al banat” which means girls hair.

in india we call it “buddi ka baal” which means old lady’s hair so yeah

In Italy we call it “Zucchero Filato” which can be translated as “spunned sugar” like worked in filaments, which in the end is how is done. Y’all need jesus.

thegooddarius:

shahlalalalala:

fialansari:

quitsexingmyunicorn:

the-trickster-and-the-optimist:

immortaliarty:

peetamellarksbuns:

unicornwright:

photonsandfrisbees:

what the f*** is cotton candy

image

O.O 

why would you call it cotton?

It’s food. Not some material.

No, you are all wrong. It is called candy floss.

image

SUGAR SPIDER

image

The French call it “ barbe à papa” - which means “Daddy’s beard”

okay so what i have learned from this post is that other countries are really f***ing weird

arabs call it “shar al banat” which means girls hair.

in india we call it “buddi ka baal” which means old lady’s hair so yeah

In Italy we call it “Zucchero Filato” which can be translated as “spunned sugar” like worked in filaments, which in the end is how is done. Y’all need jesus.

(via the-fault-in-marys-life)

"I started at the bottom,
and somehow I’m still at the bottom."

Sisyphus (probably)

(Source: life-of-a-latin-student, via the-fault-in-marys-life)

"odi et amo quare id faciam fortasse requiris
nescio sed fieri sentio et excrucior"

Catullus 85

i hate and i love. perhaps you ask why i do this; i don’t know, but i feel it and i am crucified.

(via latinthusiast)

oh those little red and green books

oh those little red and green books

(Source: latin-student-problems)

(Source: latin-student-problems)

"saepe stilum vertas, iterum quae digna legi sint
scripturus, neque te ut miretur turba labores,
contentus paucis lectoribus."

Horace Satires 1.10.72-74

"Often you will use your eraser, if you are going to write something worthy of being read over again, and you should be content with few readers, not that the crowds wonder at your works."

likeavirgil:

according to the Roman satirist Lucilius, the stern politician Marcus Crassus (nicknamed “Laughless”) only laughed once in his life

he was watching a donkey eat thistles, and he chuckled, “Thistles are like lettuce to a donkey”

realfart:

deerdem:

selkiesounds:

bogmoth:

I said “have a nice day!” to this old dude and apparently that’s not fucking good enough because he retrieved his wallet and from like a stack of 30 of these things pulled one out and gave it to me and said something like “I hope you reconsider your choices next time”

holy shit

This is the most self entitled shit i’ve seen all day

what the fUCK

this makes me want to make a courtesy card about linguistic change over time and the older equivalents to such simple statements:
have a nice day: equivalent to “I hope you have a nice day,” though expressed using what is formally referred to as the imperative mood, introduces not, in fact, a formal command, but something more akin to an optative or optative subjunctive (which moods do not have special conjugations in English present tenses)
have a good one: also equivalent to “have a nice day,” or “I hope you have a nice day,” see above for full explanation on mood and tense
not a problem: equal to “you’re welcome,” “my pleasure,” or “of course,” it can imply to the listener that s/he should not worry that the speaker felt any pressure or trouble in assisting in a minor request; most often it expresses a level of informality that would be appropriate for a stranger or, as one might imagine, a minor request rather than a serious or burdensome one
If you have received this card, you may have been alarmed at the lack of capitalized first letters of sentences, however, as I am handing you a card on the street and the grammar is fully recognizable from formal grammatical sources, it seems rather unnecessary to go to lengths to be formal. Ultimately, I intend only to open your eyes to linguistic change over time, which is inevitable even if it does not please you. 
I hope you understand that younger generations are not trying to offend or upset you, but instead understand these phrases as part of polite interaction! Thanks!

realfart:

deerdem:

selkiesounds:

bogmoth:

I said “have a nice day!” to this old dude and apparently that’s not fucking good enough because he retrieved his wallet and from like a stack of 30 of these things pulled one out and gave it to me and said something like “I hope you reconsider your choices next time”

holy shit

This is the most self entitled shit i’ve seen all day

what the fUCK

this makes me want to make a courtesy card about linguistic change over time and the older equivalents to such simple statements:

have a nice day: equivalent to “I hope you have a nice day,” though expressed using what is formally referred to as the imperative mood, introduces not, in fact, a formal command, but something more akin to an optative or optative subjunctive (which moods do not have special conjugations in English present tenses)

have a good one: also equivalent to “have a nice day,” or “I hope you have a nice day,” see above for full explanation on mood and tense

not a problem: equal to “you’re welcome,” “my pleasure,” or “of course,” it can imply to the listener that s/he should not worry that the speaker felt any pressure or trouble in assisting in a minor request; most often it expresses a level of informality that would be appropriate for a stranger or, as one might imagine, a minor request rather than a serious or burdensome one

If you have received this card, you may have been alarmed at the lack of capitalized first letters of sentences, however, as I am handing you a card on the street and the grammar is fully recognizable from formal grammatical sources, it seems rather unnecessary to go to lengths to be formal. Ultimately, I intend only to open your eyes to linguistic change over time, which is inevitable even if it does not please you. 

I hope you understand that younger generations are not trying to offend or upset you, but instead understand these phrases as part of polite interaction! Thanks!

(via coffeeatmidnight)

"βοῦς ἐπὶ γλώσσῃ μέγας βέβηκεν

A great ox has tread on [my] tongue (“Cat got my tongue!”)"

Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 36-37 (via feeloctetes)

(via et-haec)

perks of being a latinist: knowing words you’ve never actually seen

which makes me ballin at quizup, where i’m learning such words as:

organoleptic (sensory)

ramose (branch-y)

which are really not even that good examples of things that make perfect sense to me but which only make sense because I have SO MUCH context for them

My sister asks me linguistics questions pretty frequently

and recently asked me about “articulate” and how it relates both to speaking and mechanical joints

artus, -us: joint, limb

articulare: separate into joints

articulus: joint

so you can be separating your words distinctly OR also dealing with mechanical physical ACTUAL joints.

had to use that Online Etymology Dictionary to check myself.

Nova Iuncta Verba Latina / New Latin Compounds

interretialia:

κανονιοσφαρα -ας / canoniosphaera -ae f. “cannonball”
  [κανόνιον (cf. Modern Greek κανόνι) “canon” + σφαῖρα “ball”]
  [κανονιο- + σφαιρα-] stems
  [κανονιοσφαιρα-] new stem
  [κανονιοσφαῖρα] nominative singular
  [canoniosphaera] κανονιοσφαῖρα Latinized

image

(Inspiratio.)

(via the-fault-in-marys-life)